Do you use an ereader?

In the commercial world of book sales, ereaders have surged into the spotlight over the last few years. Book retailers Amazon and Barnes and Noble each release new models of their dedicated ebook readers with the same frequency as other popular electronic gadgets. Since Apple first release its popular iPad, the world of tablet of computing is also making inroads into the ebook world.

The perception, however, is that ebook readers are popular mostly among casual, pop-lit readers. If you have an ebook reader (e.g. Amazon Kindle, Barnes and Noble Nook, Kobo, Sony Reader, Apple iPad), please complete this simple survey about how you use ebook readers in an academic setting.

http://bit.ly/mPnZbn

Ephemera + Instapaper + E-reader = your own periodical

Scott McLemee, the Intellectual Affairs blogger at Inside Higher Ed, recently shared with readers his method for saving articles he finds online to his e-reader. The idea, as he explains, is to take advantage of your e-reader’s strengths (text display, large storage capacity, and portability) and start hand-crafting your own library. Think beyond the Kindle store or Sony store and explore the world of free books (books in the public domain) through Project Gutenberg, Internet Archive and other repositories of texts made available for free. And once you get the hang of it (and you’ve finished reading the 33,000 books in PG’s archive), then think creatively about those long articles you find online.

I don’t know about you, but if an article is more than 1000 words, I won’t read it online. At least, I won’t read it on a backlit screen. For years, this has meant that I print out longer articles. In his blog post, McLemee shares how he saves those articles to his e-reader. Continue reading